C3X Definitions - Part 2 of 5

Sue Curtis
26 Hammond Place
Woburn, MA 01801

Last Revised August 31, 1992


Diamond Recycle

Starting from diamonds, the points do their part of Recycle as if they were in a waves, and the centers follow the point they are looking at, to end in facing couples. You can think of it as centers 1/2 Fold behind the points, adjust to a box, Box Counter Rotate, and Roll, if that helps. This call is also a quarterly selection, Recycle the Diamond.

Diamond Recycle can also be used from facing couples, where I think of it as ``Recycle to a Diamond''. The beaus Extend to each other and Hinge, and the belles do their part of a normal facing Recycle. This is generally not used below C4, and even there it is rare.


Disband

Centers Counter Rotate and Expand (flip away), while the ends Reset 1/2 (concentrically if necessary) and Phantom Column Circulate 2. Disband can be used from both columns and lines, but is more commonly used from columns. Starting from lines, Disband is Detour and Expand the Column.

Column Example:

Line Example:

On a Column of 6 Disband, the very center 2 do the centers' part (here it is Hinge and flip away from each other), while the other 4 do the ends' part.

Most people do not fractionalize this call, but I once heard the call ``Random Invert Disband.'' Invert the first part, so the ends Counter Rotate and the centers Reset 1/2. Now do the second part normally; the centers flip away from each other, and the ends do 2 Phantom Column Circulates.


Divi Up

Centers Single Wheel; ends Divide.


{call} and Dodge

This can only be used with calls that contain a Scoot Back or Scoot Chain Thru. The ``and Dodge'' means replace the Scoot Back or Scoot Chain Thru with a Scoot and Dodge or Scoot Chain Thru and Dodge. For example, ``Tag Back and Dodge'' means 1/2 Tag, Scoot and Dodge. ``Revert the Flip Chain Thru and Dodge'' means Flip the Line 1/2, Cast 3/4, then trailers Scoot Chain Thru while the leads Dodge.


Double Down

The end facing in and the adjacent dancer do 2 Split Circulates; the others do one All 8 Circulate.

If you are the end facing in, I recommend you hold on to the adjacent center, and make sure they go with you on the 2 Split Circulates.

On Cross Double Down, the end facing in and the adjacent dancer do 2 Split Circulates as usual, but the others do a Crossover Circulate instead of a normal Circulate.

If both ends are facing in, the caller can prefer someone for the 2 Split Circulates. Sometimes the caller will say, for example, ``women are preferred for the 2 Splits, all Double Down'' and other times the caller will just say ``women are preferred for a Double Down'' and you have to know this means that the women are doing the 2 Split Circulates, and the men are doing All 8 Circulates.

Double Down can also used from columns (although this is rare). Just follow the rule carefully: end facing in and adjacent dancer (this time it is the other end) do 2 Split Circulates; others All 8 Circulate.


Double Play

Double Play is a column of 6 version of Triple Play. At the end of the call, only one person will come out of the center and two will have gone off the ends. The person coming out of the center should finish between the outside two regardless of the handedness of the setup, just as on 2 by 1 Transfer the Column.


Double Your Pleasure

Starting from columns, #1 Peel Off and Circulate, other 6 Extend and Trade. Now from the column of 6, #1 Peel Off and the other 4 Extend and Trade.

On Cross Double Your Pleasure, replace both Peel Offs with Trail Offs. On Criss Cross Double Your Pleasure, replace both Peel Offs with Trail Offs, and all Extends with Cross Extends (use the wrong hand). Criss Cross Double Your Pleasure ends in a parallelogram:

Column of 6 Double Your Pleasure works similarly; #1 Peel Off, other four Extend and Trade. Now from a box of four, leads Peel Off and trailers Extend and Trade, finishing in the very center. This call ends in a Mini-Butterfly. (Often the 2 people not doing the call will be positioned so that the overall ending setup is an hourglass.)

Magic Double Your Pleasure follows the same rules, except you have to know how to do a Magic Extend. The rule is that it is the same as 1/2 Magic Circulate; the ends' handedness is preferred. If the ends have right hands joined and the centers have lefts, then after 1/2 Magic Circulate, the (new) ends will have right hands.

Magic Column of 6 Double Your Pleasure works similarly but gets confusing on the last part, since you are supposed to be doing a Magic 1/2 Circulate, but by this time you have a normal box of 4. I believe that at this point the magic just ``goes away,'' and you do a normal Extend. (Magic is not one of the more well-defined concepts in square dancing.)

Magic Column of 6 Double Your Pleasure:


Duplicate

The call ``Duplicate {someone} and {call}'' means everyone does {someone}'s part of {call}. For example, ``Duplicate the women and Slide Thru'' means everyone does the women's part of Slide Thru. ``Duplicate the ends and Team Up'' means everyone does 1/2 Circulate and Hinge.

Unfortunately, this is not always as simple as it sounds because it isn't always clear who should be working with whom. Suppose someone called ``Duplicate the ends and Ease Off''. The ends' part of Ease Off is Zing, so presumably everyone should do a Zing. Do the centers do the Zing on their own split side, as they would if the call was just Zing, or should they work in the center, working with the same people they would work with on a normal Ease Off? In practice when I have heard this called, the caller has wanted them to work in the center, with the same people they would work with on a normal Ease Off. The same applies to ``Duplicate the ends and Detour''. ``Duplicate the ends and Eight By'' is another example; here I believe that everyone Concentrically does the ends' part of Grand Chain 8 and Roll, ending in right-hand two-faced lines.

I have also heard ``Duplicate the centers and Ease Off'', where the caller wanted everyone to Circulate (All-8) and Face In. Note that this is not the same as Central Ease Off because on Central Ease Off you must work in your own box (Box Circulate and Quarter In).


Facing Parallelogram Concept

This is similar to the Jay concept, but it is used with a two-faced line in the center instead of a wave. Everyone works in a box of four with the people they are facing on a diagonal.

Facing Parallelogram Single Rotate 1/4:


Fan Thru

Step to a wave, Slip, and step thru. Fan Thru is to Pass Thru as Wheel Fan Thru is to Wheel Thru.

Beware of Left Fan Thru; it is surprisingly difficult. Step to a left-hand wave, Slip with the right hand, and step thru.

Fan and Cross Thru is Fan Thru and Sashay.


Ferris Concept

On Ferris {call}, usually from two-faced lines, first everyone does 1/2 Press Ahead to form Triple Lines. Then everyone does the call in their Triple Lines. If at this point it is possible to compress the setup (from a 2x6 to a 2x4) by removing phantoms, then the phantoms are removed. Thus the call Ferris Wheel is actually a Ferris Wheel and Deal.

Ferris Turn and Deal:

Starting from a left-handed setup, be sure to still do a right Turn and Deal in the center.

Ferris Trade and Wheel is an exception to this. On Ferris Trade and Wheel, everyone does a Ferris Wheel except the very centers trade before they Wheel and Deal in the center. This is not the same as ``Ferris concept, Slip, Wheel and Deal,'' because the original center facing out does not trade with the phantom in the outside triple line; the outside triple lines just do a normal Wheel and Deal.

Single Ferris Wheel (from a box of four) means everyone pretend you are a couple, and do your part of Ferris Wheel.


Fiddle Around

Straight Fire Like a Couple Up.


Flare Out to a Line

Starting from two-faced lines, Couples Twosome Reset 1/4.

On a Cross Flare Out to a Line, the lead 2 go the opposite direction. If you think of the leads' part of Flare Out to a Line as a Couples Twosome Peel Off, then you can think of their part of Cross Flare Out to a Line as a Couples Twosome Trail Off.

Starting from (a) above:

Single Flare Out to a Line is the same as Reset 1/4.


Fly Away

Starting from lines with both centers facing out, centers Right Loop 1, Triple Box Circulate (usually Press Ahead), and Cross Fold, while the ends Squeeze. If the call is ``Fly Away to a {call},'' the centers do {call} after doing the Squeeze.

Left Fly Away is the mirror image (centers head towards their left, but ends do the same thing). This turns out to be equivalent to a normal Fly Away.

Fly Away can also be called from parallel lines of 3, with the center of each line facing out. In this case only one person from each line does the centers' part; the ends Squeeze as usual.

Occasionally Fly Away is used with one or both centers facing in. Here the centers must be careful to each Right Loop 1 (even if this means each going a different direction) and then Triple Box Circulate (even if it is not a Press Ahead). This usage really doesn't work very well, and the caller usually modifies it in some way.


Follow to an Hourglass

This call is related to Follow to a Diamond in the same way that Switch to an Hourglass is related to Switch to a Diamond. You can do Follow to an Hourglass as Follow to a Diamond and then very centers Snake. Alternatively, if you think of the leads' part of Follow to a Diamond as 1/2 Split Circulate, then Diamond Circulate, their part of Follow to an Hourglass is 1/2 Split Circulate, then Hourglass Circulate. The trailers' part of Follow to an Hourglass is the same as Follow to a Diamond.


Go First Class

Leads Switch the Wave; trailers do your part of Scatter Circulate.


Good and Little/Plenty/Little More

Good and Little is Centers Recoil, Ends Circulate 2. Good and Plenty is Good and Little, then finish Plenty as if you had just done an ordinary Little (Box Circulate 2, ends Counter Rotate and Roll, centers have the leads Roll Out to a Wave). Good and Little More is Good and Little, then centers Circulate.

If you know the C4 call Counterpoint, you can think of Good and Little as Counterpoint and Little (if you don't mind doing the Little from diamonds).


Grand Erase

Starting from a tidal wave, the center six U-Turn Back, while the very end does a Counter Rotate.

Note that the very end moves all the way up to the center triple diamond, unlike the calls Grand Spin the Top and Grand Lockit, where the person coming off the end finishes in the outside triple line.


Grand Walk and Dodge

You must start by realizing that All 8 Walk and Dodge and Grand Walk and Dodge are two different calls. On All 8 Walk and Dodge (from a column), 6 people (trailers) Walk and 2 (leaders) Dodge. Grand Walk and Dodge is first All 8 Walk and Dodge, then the new centers Walk and Dodge.


Grand Working Concept

Grand Working {direction} is a method of precisely specifying how to do many calls that you think of as ``Grand'' calls. The advantage of using ``Grand Working {direction}'' instead of just Grand is that it is more precise and allows you to figure out new Grand calls even if they have never been called before.

On Grand Working {direction} from a 2x4, everyone does the call given, but different people are working in different boxes. The ends always work on their own side (split). Some of the centers will be working in the center; others will be working on each side. Each center chooses a group of four to work in by selecting the setup that is in the direction given from where they stand. Starting from a 2x4 setup, the direction may be Right, Left, Forward, or Behind.

Example #1: Grand Working Right, Cross and Turn

You've probably seen Example #1 called before as simply Grand Cross and Turn. On Grand Working Right, the centers must identify which box is to their right. For dancers #3 and #7, this is the center box. For dancers #2 and #6, this is the end box. Thus, dancers #3 and #7 do a Cross and Turn in the center box, while the other 6 dancers all do a Cross and Turn on their own side.

Here's one you probably haven't seen called without the ``Working'' terminology:

Example #2: Grand Working Right, Shakedown

Again the centers must identify which box is to their right. For dancers #2 and #6, this is the center box. For dancers #3 and #7, this is the end box. Thus, dancers #2 and #6 do a Shakedown in the center box, while the other 6 dancers all do a Shakedown on their own side.

Example #3: Grand Working Forward, Shake and Rattle

In Example #3, the centers must work with the box they are facing. For dancers #2 and #6, this is the center box. For dancers #3 and #7, this is the end box. Thus, dancers #2 and #6 do a Shake and Rattle in the center box, while the other 6 dancers all do a Shake and Rattle on their own side.

Grand Working {direction} can also be used from a 1x8 setup such as a tidal wave. Here the people in the center wave may work either with the wave in the center or with the wave on their own side, according to the direction given. The others will always work with the wave on their own side.

Example #4: Grand Working Right Swap the Wave (a.k.a. Grand Swap the Wave)

In Example #4, the four dancers in the center wave must work with the wave to their right. For dancers #4 and #8, this is the center wave. For dancers #3 and #7, this is the wave on their own side.

Example #5: Grand Working Left Recycle

In Example #5, the four people in the center wave must work with the wave towards their left. This time dancers #4 and #8 are working with the wave on their own side, while dancers #3 and #7 are working in the center wave.

It would be nice if the name Grand Working Right/Left covered every example that callers wanted to use from a tidal line, but unfortunately this is not the case. The other ways of specifying Grand Working from a 1x8 setup are ``Grand Working as Centers,'' ``Grand Working as Ends,'' ``Grand Working Together,'' and ``Grand Working Apart.'' On Grand Working as Centers, those in the center wave choose to work in whichever wave they are centers; on Grand Working as Ends, they choose to work in whichever wave they are ends. Example #4 could have been called ``Grand Working as Centers'' since dancer #3 is a center in the outside wave, and dancer #4 is a center in the center wave. Example #5 could have been called ``Grand Working as Ends'' because dancer #3 is an end in the center wave, and dancer #4 is an end in the outside wave.

Grand Working Together means work with the people you are closer to, and Grand Working Apart means work with the people you are farther from. On Grand Working Together, dancer #3 is closer to dancers #1 and #2 than to #8 and #7, and therefore works in the outside wave. Dancer #4 is closer to dancers #8 and #7 than to #1 and #2, and therefore works in the center wave. Grand Working Apart is the opposite. It turns out that Grand Working Together is always the same as Grand Working as Centers, and Grand Working Apart is always the same as Grand Working as Ends. So why are there two sets of names? Basically because this concept is new and people are not yet sure which names are easiest for people to think about. I included both sets here, because I'm not sure which set will stick. Whatever happens, remember that the direction given applies only to the center wave; the outsides always work on their own split side.


Hang a Right

Starting from a completed double pass thru setup, first couple go right, second couple go right and follow them, ending in two-faced lines. As Couples In Tandem Roll Right to a Wave, if you prefer. Hang a Left is the mirror image.

Single Hang a Right is a Tandem Roll Right to a Wave.


Hang Loose

Starting from waves, the trailers Extend and Trade. The original lead end does a Cast Back, meets one of the original trailers, and Trades with them. The original lead center does a Cross Fold (or Cross Run). Now those facing Pass In, and the others step forward and Bend the Line. Some people think of the leaders' parts as Quarter away from the handedness of the wave (left from right-hand waves and vice versa), then (almost) Counter Rotate, rather than thinking about Cast Back and Cross Run.


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